Video: Macular Degeneration

“As the ‘baby boom’ generation ages, and in the absence of further prevention and treatment advances, the prevalence of AMD (age-related macular degeneration) is estimated to reach epidemic proportions of 6.3 million Americans by the year 2030,” said Dr. Carl Kupfer, the former Director of the National Eye Institute, NIH.

The macula is responsible for what we see straight in front of us, our field of vision.  It is located at the center of the retina.

Macular (MAC-you-lar) Degeneration, also called age-related macular degeneration (ARMD or AMD), is a progressive deterioration of the portion of the retina called the macula lutea, resulting in loss of central vision.

Facts About Macular Degeneration

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Macular Degeneration
  • two types: dry and wet
  • most start as the dry type and in 10-20% of individuals it progresses to the wet type
  • occurs in both eyes but may not progress at the same pace
  •  leading cause of vision loss, affecting more than 10 million Americans
  • cause is unknown
  • considered an incurable eye disease
  • biggest risk factor is age, most likely to occur in those 55 and older

Click AMDF  for more information.

 

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Video and Information Source: American Macular Degeneration Foundation

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